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Basics of Public Health Preparedness

These ten introductory, online trainings provide the main concepts of public health preparedness. Each module can be completed within 15 minutes to 50 minutes. 

Modules include:

  • Module 1: Introduction to Public Health Preparedness for Preparedness Staff
  • Module 2: Public Health Preparedness Planning  
  • Module 3: Public Health Preparedness Exercises  
  • Module 4: Medical Countermeasures  
  • Module 5: Responder Health and Safety
  • Module 6: Occupational Health for Public Health Responders
  • Module 7: Disaster Behavioral Health  
  • Module 8: Working with Community Partners  
  • Module 9: Disaster Epidemiology
  • Module 10: Risk Communication

Modules are intended for staff from state and local health departments.

This training was developed with the support of the UNC Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (UNC PERLC), a funded project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC Cooperative Agreement 1U90TP000415). The UNC PERLC gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the West Virginia Center for Threat Preparedness and the North Carolina Public Health Preparedness and Response Branch in shaping the content and framework for this training.

CDC Public Health 101 Training Plan

CDC's Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development presents the Public Health 101 Training Plan.

The Public Health 101 Series contains six courses that introduce learners to public health and the core sciences of public health practice. The series is comprised of the following courses:

• Introduction to Public Health
• Introduction to Epidemiology
• Introduction to Public Health Informatics
• Introduction to Public Health Surveillance
• Introduction to Prevention Effectiveness
• Introduction to Public Health Laboratories

Each course contains definitions and key terms, the public health approach, an overview of the core topic, knowledge checks, and references.

The Public Health 101 Series can benefit the following groups:

• Those who work in public health but who have not had formal training in a particular core area
• Those who have had public health education and would like a refresher
• Students or others interested in pursuing careers in public health
• Health educators and instructors responsible for the training and professional development of the public health workforce

Each course takes between 40 and 60 minutes to complete. The first course, Introduction to Public Health, is required for the training plan and you are  encouraged to select one or more of the optional courses to round out your public health 101 needs.

Community Health Assessment & Improvement Planning

Based on practical materials from the Community Tool Box, http://ctb.ku.edu, these eight short online trainings provide practical guidance for conducting community health assessments and developing and implementing community health improvement plans.  Each module can be completed within 45 minutes to 1 hour. 

Modules include:

  • Module 1: Assuring Engagement in Community Health Improvement Efforts
  • Module 2: Identifying Community Health Needs and Assets
  • Module 3: Conducting Community Health Assessments
  • Module 4: Setting Community Priorities Based on Identified Issues
  • Module 5: Developing a Logic Model for Community Health Improvement
  • Module 6: Developing a Strategic Plan for Community Health Improvement
  • Module 7: Developing an Intervention
  • Module 8: Assuring Collaboration During Implementation

Modules are intended for staff from state and local health departments, including those seeking accreditation, hospital staff who are considering new federal requirements for non-profit hospitals, and those in community benefit programs, non-profit organizations and community leaders/members.

These courses were developed in partnership with the KDHE State Office of Rural Health, and are a public service of the Work Group for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas.

Disaster Information Specialist Program - Advanced

The National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Specialization Advanced Training plan can be earned once the Basic level Specialization has been earned. An additional 12 hours are required for the Advanced Level and may be gained through courses and activities.

Modules include:

  • Ethical and Legal Aspects of Disaster Response
  • A Seat at the Table: Working with Local Responders
  • Health and Disasters: Understanding the International Context
  • Packing Your Digital Go-Bag: Essential Disaster Health Information on Your Mobile Device
  • Health Information Resources  for CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives): New!

Modules are intended for librarians, informationists and library staff as well as workers from other professions (medical, nursing, first response, environmental health, emergency planning, etc.) who may play a role in disaster preparedness, response and recovery

Disaster Information Specialization - Basic Level The National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Specialization Basic Training plan provides an overview of the main concepts of disaster preparedness and management. Each of the five module can be completed online within three hours. The Medical Library Association offers a Disaster Information Specialization document of completion that recognizes the achievement of anyone who completes required courses.

Modules include: 
  • Disaster Health Information: The Basics
  • US Response to Disasters and Public Health Emergencies
  • Information Roles in Disaster Management
  • IS-700.a National Incident Management Systems (NIMS): An Introduction
  • IS-100.b Introduction to Incident Command Systems, ICS-100 
Modules are intended for librarians, informationists and library staff as well as workers from other professions (medical, nursing, first response, environmental health, emergency planning, etc.) who may play a role in disaster preparedness, response and recovery. 
E is for Epidemiology

These eleven introductory, online trainings provide the main concepts of epidemiology. Each module can be completed within 15 minutes to 40 minutes. 

Modules include:

  • Module 1: Epidemiology: A Basic Public Health Science
  • Module 2: The Practice of Epidemiology: An Overview  
  • Module 3: Epidemiology Tools and Methods
  • Module 4: Epidemiology Partners and Resources
  • Module 5: Descriptive Epidemiology
  • Module 6: Study Designs for Analytic Epidemiology
  • Module 7: Data Analysis Basics for Analytic Epidemiology
  • Module 8: Introduction to Surveillance
  • Module 9: Federal Public Health Surveillance
  • Module 10: Epidemiology Applications: Disaster and Environmental Epidemiology
  • Module 11: Epidemiology Applications: Forensic Epidemiology & Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology

Modules were developed to introduce non-epidemiologists to the basic concepts of epidemiology.

This training was developed with the support of the UNC Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (UNC PERLC), a funded project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC Cooperative Agreement 1U90TP000415).

Environmental Public Health Online Courses (EPHOC) Environmental Public Health Online Courses (EPHOC) is a comprehensive package of online trainings for environmental public health practitioners. The 15 trainings are taught by experts in their field and includes information on various roles and responsibilities of environmental public health staff.

Modules include:
  • 01- General Environmental Health
  • 02- Statutes and Regulations
  • 03- Food Protection
  • 04- Potable Water
  • 05- Wastewater
  • 06- Solid and Hazardous Waste
  • 07- Hazardous Materials
  • 08- Zoonoses, Vectors, Pests, and Weeds
  • 09- Radiation Protection
  • 10- Occupational Safety and Health
  • 11- Air Quality and Environmental Noise
  • 12- Housing Sanitation and Safety
  • 13- Institutions and Licensed Establishments
  • 14- Swimming Pools and Recreational Facilities
  • 15- Disaster Sanitation
Target audiences are: New-hire environmental public health professionals; Individuals preparing for a state or national credential exam; Environmental health and other students; and Environmental public health professionals wanting to improve their technical knowledge. This bundle of trainings are designed to be used as a study guide for the NEHA exam.
Foundations of Public Health Preparedness

To register for the Training Plan you must first log in or create an account. Once you are logged in, navigate back to the Training Plan details page to register for the Training Plan or view the individual course details.  
Effective emergency preparedness and response, and ultimately national health security, cannot be achieved without a cadre of highly skilled and trained frontline public health workers. These introductory, online trainings provide the learner with some of the main concepts of public health preparedness that are important for every public health worker, regardless of the organization in which he or she works. For a broad overview and context for public health preparedness and response, foundational training offerings are listed here first, and it is recommended they be completed prior to the other courses.

Public health preparedness and response foundational training offerings:

               NIMS: ICS 100, ICS 700, ICS 800

 

The following courses are organized by Public Health Preparedness and Response Core Competency Model domains. Each course can be completed within 15 minutes to one hour.  They include:

 

Domain 1. Model Leadership

Domain 2. Communicate and Manage Information 

Domain 3. Plan for and Improve Practice

Domain 4. Protect Worker Health and Safety


For more public health preparedness and response training offerings, visit the CDC Learning Connection and CDC TRAIN.

 

This training plan was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response in collaboration with the Public Health Foundation to support improvement of an individual public health worker’s competence in public health preparedness and response.  Courses listed here were selected through a subject matter expert review process* from the vast amount of public health preparedness related courses available on TRAIN.  These courses do not represent all of the high-quality public health preparedness training offerings located on TRAIN. This training plan is intended to be a living plan, and will be updated with new offerings periodically. CDC and PHF welcome feedback on and participation in the ongoing development of this plan.

* Public Health Preparedness Training Plan Methodology

Health Literacy for Health Professionals

CDC's Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC) offers six online health literacy courses for health professionals. Training in health literacy, plain language, and culture and communication is essential for anyone working in health information and services.

The introductory course “Health Literacy for Public Health Professionals” is required, as well as at least one of the following courses:

  • Writing for the Public
  • Speaking for the Public
  • Using Numbers and Explaining Risk
  • Creating Easier to Understand Lists, Charts, and Graphs

The "Writing for the Public" course is recommended for the second course. These courses can be taken in any order, however, depending on your interests and training needs.

Please send your comments and suggestions about other training courses or needs to OADC's health literacy team.

I is for Investigation

These seven introductory, online trainings provide the main concepts of epidemiology. Each module can be completed within 35 minutes to 50 minutes. 

Modules include:

  • Module 1: Recognizing an Outbreak
  • Module 2: Study Design
  • Module 3: Designing Questionnaires
  • Module 4: Interviewing Techniques
  • Module 5: Analyzing Data
  • Module 6: Writing an Outbreak Report
  • Module 7: Risk and Crisis Communication

Modules were developed to introduce developed to introduce non-epidemiologists to the basic concepts of outbreak investigation.

This training was developed with the support of the UNC Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (UNC PERLC), a funded project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC Cooperative Agreement 1U90TP000415).

Infection Prevention and Control for US Healthcare What You Need to Know About Infection Control

This series of six CME/CE videos addresses key issues surrounding infection prevention in healthcare facilities. Each video can be completed within 15 minutes to 30 minutes.

The series includes:

1.Risk Recognition in Healthcare Settings
2.Environmental Services and Infection Prevention
3.Recognizing Infection Risks in Medical Equipment
4.Infection Transmission Risks Associated with Nonsterile Glove Use
5.Infection Prevention: A Hierarchy of Controls Approach
6.Injection Safety: A System Approach

The videos are intended for US Healthcare Workers including:
◾Primary care physicians
◾Public health and preventive medicine specialists
◾Emergency medicine physicians
◾Pharmacists
◾Nurses

Video Descriptions

Risk Recognition in Healthcare Settings
Authors: Michael Bell, MD; Lisa Maragakis, MD, MPH; Peter Pronovost, MD, PhD
CME / ABIM MOC / CE
Released: 4/21/2017 Valid for credit through: 4/21/2019
This activity is intended for primary care physicians, public health and preventive medicine specialists, emergency medicine physicians, pharmacists, and nurses.
The goal of this activity is to provide an overview of microorganisms that cause infection and how they are spread, as well as to describe risk recognition.
Upon completion of this activity, participants will have increased knowledge regarding the:
• Risks of infection present in healthcare settings
• Precautionary practices to recognize and mitigate the risks of infection

Environmental Services and Infection Prevention
Authors: Patti Costello; Ruth Carrico, PhD, MSN, FNP; Russell N. Olmsted, MPH, CIC
CME / ABIM MOC / CE
Released: 6/7/2017 Valid for credit through: 6/7/2019
This activity is intended for primary care physicians, public health & preventive medicine specialists, emergency medicine physicians, infectious disease specialists, and nurses.
The goal of this activity is to recognize the factors that may contribute to infection risk in a healthcare environment and learn about preventive practices to minimize healthcare-associated infections.
Upon completion of this activity, participants will have greater knowledge regarding
• The factors that may contribute to infection risk in the healthcare setting
• Preventive practices to minimize infection risks

Recognizing Infection Risks in Medical Equipment Authors:
Michael Bell, MD; Daniel Diekema, MD; J. Hudson Garrett, Jr, PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP-BC
CME / ABIM MOC / CE
Released: 6/26/2017 Valid for credit through: 6/26/2019
This activity is intended for primary care physicians, public health & preventive medicine specialists, emergency medicine physicians, and nurses.
The goal of this activity is to raise awareness among healthcare providers about the risks of infection associated with the use and maintenance of medical equipment and devices.
Upon completion of this activity, participants will have increased knowledge regarding the:
• Infection risks associated with medical equipment
• Infection risk assessment and how it may be incorporated into purchasing decisions
• Development of an action plan to mitigate infection risk related to the clinical environment

Infection Transmission Risks Associated With Nonsterile Glove Use
Authors: Michael Bell, MD; Ruth Carrico, PhD, MSN, FNP; J. Hudson Garrett Jr, PhD, MSN, MPH, FNP; Sujan C. Reddy, MD
CME / ABIM MOC / CE
Released: 7/17/2017 Valid for credit through: 7/17/2019
This activity is intended for primary care physicians, public health and preventive medicine specialists, and emergency medicine physicians.
The goal of this activity is to provide information about appropriate hand hygiene and glove use to decrease infection transmission.
Upon completion of this activity, participants will have greater knowledge regarding:
• How hand hygiene prevents transmission of infection with appropriate use of soap and water, alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR), and nonsterile gloves
• Glove management and the identification of correct vs incorrect glove use

Infection Prevention: A Hierarchy of Controls Approach
Authors: Vineet Chopra, MD, MSc; Bryan Christensen, PhD, MEPC; Lynn Janssen, MS, CIC, CPHQ
CME / ABIM MOC / CE
Released: 8/21/2017 Valid for credit through: 8/21/2019
This activity is intended for primary care physicians, public health & preventive medicine specialists, emergency medicine physicians, and nurses.
The goal of this activity is to review the concept of hierarchy of controls and how it can be applied to healthcare-associated infection prevention.
Upon completion of this activity, participants will have:
• Increased knowledge regarding the elements of prevention through design, using the concept of hierarchy of controls
• Increased competency regarding how a hierarchy of controls can be applied to infection risks

Injection Safety: A System Approach
Authors: Joseph Perz, DrPH, MA; Marion A. Kainer, MD, MPH, FRACP, FSHEA; Timothy Wiemken, PhD, MPH, CIC
CME / ABIM MOC / CE
Released: 9/18/2017 Valid for credit through: 9/18/2019
This activity is intended for primary care physicians; public health and preventive medicine specialists; emergency medicine physician; nurses, pharmacists, and anyone who has oversight for, prepares, and/or administers injectable medications.
The goal of this activity is to educate clinicians about safety risks associated with breaches in use of injectable medications and the importance of implementing a system-wide approach to prevent those risks from occurring. Upon completion of this activity, participants will:
• Have increased knowledge regarding the
        o System-wide processes, procedures, or situations that place patients at risk due to breaches in injection safety
       o Infection transmission risks associated with healthcare provider narcotic diversion behavior
• Have greater competence related to
       o Strategies to mitigate these risks               
Medical Reserve Corps Epidemiology Training

These three introductory, online training modules provide the main concepts of epidemiology for Medical Reserve Corps volunteers. Each module can be completed within 35 minutes to 40 minutes.

Modules Include:

  • Module 1: Introduction to Epidemiology
  • Module 2: Outbreak Investigations
  • Module 3: Interviewing Techniques

This training series was developed by the NC Institute for Public Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. 

National STD Curriculum

The new National STD Curriculum website addresses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, management and prevention of STDs. The curriculum is free, up-to-date, and integrates the most recent CDC STD Treatment Guidelines. Funded by a grant from the CDC and developed by the University of Washington STD Prevention Training Center and the University of Washington, this website replaces the former CDC STD Self Study Modules for Clinicians.

 

Free CME and CNE credit is available from the seven self-study/quick reference modules and the Question Bank section which features 100+ interactive board-review style questions. Each module can be completed within 60 minutes and 1 CME and CNE credit is available through the National STD Curriculum website. Time needed to complete a Question Bank topic varies by STD but ranges from 30 minutes to 1.75 hours so available CE varies from .5 to 1.75. CE certificates are not issued within TRAIN. CE expiration: January 31, 2020.

 

Anyone can study any topic in any order but registration on the website is required to obtain CE. Once registered, progress can be tracked regardless if CE is attempted. The website also offers group registration and tracking for staff, students, and healthcare organizations.

 

Target audience: Physicians, physician assistants, advanced practice nurses, nurses, nurse-midwives and other health care professionals with an interest in STD diagnosis, management, and prevention.

 

The 7 modules available through TRAIN:  

Chlamydia

Gonorrhea

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) – Genital

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Syphilis

Vaginitis

 

The 12 Question Bank topics through TRAIN:

Bacterial Vaginosis

Candidiasis - Vulvovaginal

Chancroid

Chlamydia

Epididymitis

Gonorrhea

Granuloma Inguinale

Herpes Simplex Virus – Genital 

Lymphogranuloma venereum

Mycoplasma genitalium

Proctitis, Proctocolitis, and Enteritis

Trichomoniasis

 

For each STD, the learning objectives for the modules and/or the Question Bank usually include some of the following:
 

1. Summarize the epidemiology in the United States.

2. Describe the microbiology, life cycle, and transmission.

3. Discuss the clinical manifestations in men, women, and children.

4. Compare laboratory diagnostic methods used to diagnosis.

5. Discuss serologic screening in asymptomatic persons.

6. List the CDC-recommended treatment regimens.

7. Summarize counseling and education messages for individuals with that STD.

 

Summary of Accreditations:        

Continuing Medical Education (CME)

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the University of Alabama School of Medicine (UASOM) and the University of Washington (UW).  The UASOM is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.    

 

Continuing Nursing Education (CNE)

Continuing Nursing Education at the University of Washington School of Nursing (UWCNE) is accredited with distinction as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

 

UWCNE is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider # 7218.

 

To attain CE credit for a topic through the National STD Curriculum Website:

  1. Review the material

  2. Correctly answer 80% of the questions

  3. Select either CME or CNE (depending upon your discipline and the certificate you wish to receive)

  4. Complete and submit the evaluation form

  5. Print your certificate

 

For questions, please email idce@uw.edu or call (206) 543-4327.

PCSS-O Pain Curriculum: Strategies for Providers


To register for the Training Plan you must first log in or create an account. Once you are logged in, navigate back to the Training Plan details page to register for the Training Plan or view the individual course details. PCSS-O clinical experts, led by Roger Chou, MD, FACP and Melissa B. Weimer, DO, MCR, who have extensive knowledge in treating chronic pain, have developed a comprehensive core curriculum for primary care providers who want to have in-depth knowledge in treating chronic pain. The modules that make up the curriculum give up-to-date and evidence-based information on best opioid prescribing practices.

This course will provide clinicians with a solid base when treating chronic pain. The curriculum was created in an effort to consolidate the vast amount of information available to clinicians into a course that provides clinicians with the information, resources, and knowledge they need to treat their patients who suffer from chronic pain, including non-pharmacological treatments. The result is the most comprehensive and up to date curriculum developed thus far for the treatment of chronic pain.

Participants will receive a certificate of completion following each completed module and a final certificate when all modules have been completed. Each module (except the Overview module) is designated for 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. 


Funding for this initiative was made possible (in part) by grant no. 5H79TI025595-03 from SAMHSA. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Training Tools for Healthy Schools

To register for the Training Plan you must first log in or create an account. Once you are logged in, navigate back to the Training Plan details page to register for the Training Plan or view the individual course details.

The Training Tools for Healthy Schools: Promoting Health and Academic Success, eLearning series consists of four core training tools that have been converted to 1-1.5 hour modules for the ease and flexibility for online learners to have easier access to our tools. Continuing education credits are offered to most participants, along with a certificate of completion at the end of each module. All four modules have a very robust Go Further section to gain additional knowledge and resources.

Training Tools for Healthy Schools E-Learning Series:

•Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program: A Guide for Schools
•Parents for Healthy Schools
•School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity
•School Health Index: A Self-Assessment and Planning Guide

A fifth module will be added soon.

There is continuing education offered for the following modules:

•Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program: A Guide for Schools - Course WB2615
•School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity - Course WB2613
•School Health Index: A Self-Assessment and Planning Guide - Course WB2614

More information on CE can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/tths/e-learning.htm

To view course information, login/create your account and then register. You may withdraw at any time. 

Vector Control for Env. Health Professionals Vector Control for Environmental Health Professionals (VCEHP)

Environmental health professionals are on the frontline of helping individuals, institutions, and communities reduce threats from mosquitoes, ticks, and other vectors. This training—Vector Control for Environmental Health Professionals—emphasizes the use of integrated pest management to address public health pests and vectors that spread diseases, including Zika virus and others.

What Are the Benefits of This Training?
  • It’s free and flexible: Take the courses you want, when you want in this online learning program.
  • It’s credible: Learn the latest science and evidence from vector control experts to improve your awareness and understanding of vector control and pest management.
  • It’s practical: Access concrete principles, practices, and resources to address vector control issues affecting your community.
  • You can earn continuing education units (CEUs): Obtain CEUs from the National Environmental Health Association upon completing the courses and final evaluation (optional).
What Topics Are Addressed?
The training includes 11 courses. Take all of them or pick and choose (the first three are required, then take courses in any order):
  • Vector-Borne Diseases of Public Health Importance
  • Integrated Pest Management Basics
  • Performance Assessment and Improvement of Vector Control Services 
  • Tick Biology and Control
  • Mosquito Biology and Control
  • Toxicology of Pesticides
  • Rodent Management
  • Pests and Vectors in Food and Housing Environments
  • Special Pest Management Considerations for Schools
  • Risk Communication Basics
  • Bed Bug Biology and Control
How Long Does It Take?
Each course takes between an hour to 2½ hours, depending on the course being taken.

Who Developed It?
Several groups and individuals worked together to create this training series, which updates CDC’s past popular trainings on vector control. CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health collaborated with National Network of Public Health Institutes, Texas Health Institute, Tulane University, National Environmental Health Association, and additional subject-matter experts in vector control and pest management.
WIC Learning Online

These seven introductory, online trainings are designed for all levels of staff working in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Topics are also appropriate for staff working in the field of maternal and child health.

Modules include:

  • WIC 101 (2016-2017)
  • WIC Breastfeeding Basics (2016-2017)
  • WIC Baby Behavior Basics (2016-2017)
  • Value Enhanced Nutrition Assessment (VENA) (2016-2017)
  • VENA: Connecting the Dots Between Assessment and Intervention (2016-2017)
  • Feeding Infants: Nourishing Attitudes and Techniques (2017)
  • Communicating with Participants (2016-2017)

This training series was developed by the USDA, WIC Works Resource System. The WIC Works Resource System is an online education and training center for WIC staff. It is a joint project between the National Agricultural Library/Food and Nutrition Information Center, USDA/Food and Nutrition Service, and the University of Maryland.

Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) The Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) Online Training Series focuses on key components of an integrated approach to promoting the health of women during late adolescence and throughout the child-bearing years. This training series arose from the need for practice-based tools that advance multi-disciplinary partnership, community engagement and using evidence-based approaches grounded in proven theoretical models. Each module can be completed within 20 minutes to 60 minutes. 

Modules Include: 
  • Module 1: Introduction to an Integrated Approach
  • Module 2: Defining the Challenge 
  • Module 3: Principles and Frameworks Guiding the Integrated Approach
  • Module 4: Developing Evidence-Based Programs
  • Module 5: Building and Supporting Partnerships and Community Engagement
  • Module 6: Bringing it All Together - An Integrated Approach
Women's Integrated Systems for Health (WISH) was a training grant funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 2010-13 with a partnership between the NC Institute for Public Health and the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and the UNC Center for Maternal and Infant Health at the UNC School of Medicine. The project focused on promoting integrative community approaches to optimize mental and physical health among adolescents and women of reproductive age.